ILMA 2018 Conference Recap

For those who could not attend the 2018 Annual ILMA Conference, it was held in Bloomington just two weeks ago at the Best Western Park Regency, which is a nice site on the edge of town.  The conference once again included an excellent and diverse grouping of presentation topics which are now available on ILMA’s website, along with previous year’s presentations.

Your 2018 Board of Directors openings were filled, and award winners were recognized, but it is important that we take the extra time to showcase the individuals who received the awards.  These awards recognize individuals who put in extra time, make an effort to go out of their comfort zone, take on something that they don’t always understand at first, or put in hours well beyond their normal working schedule.  When these people or groups are recognized it means something great is happening with out lakes, streams and watersheds.  Attached below is not only the award winners, but the introduction provided by there presenters and other additional information.  This helps provide the context and reasoning behind the nomination and what makes theses awards special.

Lake Guardian: BRYAN CROSS

Each year the Illinois Lake Guardian Award is presented in recognition of exceptional effort to enhance and preserve the quality of Illinois lakes

The person receiving the 2018 award has been associated with ILMA and Illinois lakes for several years.

As a consultant, ILMA Director and Officer and professional in the field of Lake Management this person’s management skills has engineered near perfect solutions to issues confronting lake managers, lake users and lake communities throughout the State of Illinois.

The enthusiasm that is demonstrated by this person is contagious.  Dedication to detail is a trademark approach that results in sensible solutions to both water quality and soil erosion issues in lakes and stream corridors.

In addition, I have had the personal privilege of working with him and observing both his planning and organizational  leadership skills.

It is my extreme pleasure and honor to present to you, Mr. Bryan Cross, ILMA’s  2018 Illinois Lake Guardian.

Loftus Award:  Steve Burgoon of Tower Lake’s

Last Thursday, March 22, at the 33rd Annual Conference of the Illinois Lakes Management Association(ILMA) Steve Burgoon received the Frank Loftus Conservation Award for Lake Volunteer Stewardship Efforts. This award was established in 2002 by the Association in posthumous honor of Frank who was a tireless, lifelong conservation volunteer. One deserving person in Illinois receives this award each year.

Steve Burgoon was nominated and unanimously approved by ILMA’s board for his impressive lake protection resume. Steve, having twice served extensive terms on both the Tower Lakes Improvement Association (TLIA) Lake Committee and its’ governing Board, was instrumental in two major projects to protect and repair Tower Lakes: a shoreline effort, many years ago and TLIA’s more recent and ongoing Silt Removal project.

Steve has also dedicated untold hours to organizing and guiding efforts to connect our local lake communities. Working with representatives from Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) and Barrington Area Conservation Trust (BACT) he was key to establishing local working groups: The Tower Lakes Drain Partnership (TLDP) which became the 4 Lakes group and now is part of the CMAP 9 Lakes Watershed Plan. These connections and planning were key to the grants TLIA has received for the Dredging and Raingarden projects.

Steve with his wife Chris have raised five beautiful and accomplished children. Despite being a national sales manager for a housewares company, calling for more than a little travel, he had served as a Cub Scout and Boy Scout Leader for 13 years, soccer coach … you get the idea! He participates in almost all community related volunteer activity like the Spring and Fall Clean-ups of TLIA’s 46 acres of parks and shoreline. He has organized and waded-in our manual invasive lake weed control efforts and has served on our VLMP group since its’ inception.

Our Community and our State is lucky to have Steve’s leadership and spirit volunteerism.

Submitted by Rich Bahr – Past president of ILMA

Dick Hilton Watershed Stewardship Award: Beth Baranski

I am pleased to announce that this year’s recipient of the Dick Hilton Watershed Stewardship Award is Beth Buranski. Beth is an extremely ambitious and deserving recipient of this award and I am glad she is present to receive it. Let me tell you a few things about Beth:

Beth has a degree in architecture and works part-time as a bookkeeper and doing special projects for her husband’s architectural firm, but her full-time “job” is as a volunteer Project Coordinator for the League of Women Voters of Jo Daviess County. According to Beth, the title Project Coordinator was made up so she could fill in blanks on grant applications! Beth has been successful in securing multiple grants and her time is used as in-kind match to leverage the grant funding.

The League of Women Voters of Jo Daviess County has been spearheading water resource management efforts in the far northwest corner of the state since 2012. As Project Coordinator, Beth worked with many partners to organize and facilitate a two-year county-wide planning process.  The end result is a broad base of shared understanding about water resource issues and the actions needed to protect local water quality above and below ground.

Beth has organized and is in the process of facilitating watershed-based planning for the Lower Galena River watershed with Section 319 IEPA funding support. The Lower Galena River watershed is just the first subwatershed-based planning process in the county. They propose to initiate a new subwatershed-based planning process approximately every two years until the entire county is covered. Beth describes this effort as a forever project –  as in water resource management doesn’t have a beginning and an end!

In an ongoing effort, The League of Women Voters of Jo Daviess County has been working hard to develop trusting relationships with local leaders in the agricultural community. The USFWS has a Fishers & Farmers Program that promotes farmer-led groups working on issues that improve water quality. Beth engaged Galena-area farmers to become the “Soil & Water Health Coalition.” With a grant from USFWS and a donation from a local fertilizer plant, the Coalition is running a series of Soil & Health educational events. The most recent event was held on Feb 21st and was free to area farmers.

Most recently and due primarily to Beth’s efforts, the League of Women Voters of Jo Daviess County was awarded $10,000 in prize money in a USEPA sponsored “Nutrient Sensor Action Challenge”. The Challenge is a technology-accelerating water quality contest to demonstrate how nutrient sensors can be used by states and local communities to help manage nutrient pollution. Working with scientists from the Illinois State Geological and Water Surveys, a project was designed for deploying two low-cost sensors, one each at the top and bottom of the Lower Galena River subwatershed to gather continuous data on nitrate levels. The real-time continuous data will be available to local farmers to assist them in their day-to-day decision-making. Sensors are planned to be installed this month. The first 3-months of real-time online data will be submitted to US EPA for Stage II of the Challenge.  Beth hopes to secure an additional award of up to $100,000.

Beth’s life and work is framed by the desire to support shared learning, document consensus, and take action to achieve science-based stewardship of our water resources and watersheds.

At this time, I’d like to introduce Beth Buranski and to present her with the Dick Hilton Watershed award.


Lastly we will provide just a quick summary regarding our scholarships.  Keith Gray of Integrated Lakes Management (ILM) deserves a shout as their company continues to strongly support this initiative:

ILMA – $1000 Elizabeth Berg
Kolsto IEPA – $1000 Anthony Breitenbach
Bob Esser Not awarded due to no volunteerism
ILM – $500 Gare Ambrsoe-Igho
ILM – $500 Jared Bilak

ILMA will be giving out two scholarships this year.  Both are $1000 funded by the ILMA membership and the IEPA. These are open to full time undergraduate or graduate students who have a college or university cumulative GPA of at least 2.5 on an undergraduate 4.0 scale and 3.0 on a graduate 4.0 scale, enrolled in a natural resource discipline related to lake and/or watershed management. Eligible applicants include Illinois residents enrolled in accredited colleges and universities within Indiana, Minnesota, Ohio, or Wisconsin and/or students enrolled in an accredited Illinois college or university.

ILMA does have another scholarship that will not be presented this year due to the lack of volunteerism of the applications received. This scholarship is the $500 Robert Esser Student Achievement Scholarship.  This scholarship is available to an Illinois resident attending an Illinois accredited college or university. A full time junior or senior undergraduate student or graduate student is preferred. Attendance at the Annual Meeting of the Illinois Lake Management Association (ILMA) is strongly encouraged. Student must be enrolled in a lake-related curriculum with clearly articulated personal goals and objectives geared toward Illinois lakes. Emphasis will be placed on volunteer experiences.

Integrated Lakes Management wanted to enhance the scholarships again this year by donating an additional $1000.  ILM has been very generous to ILMA, but doesn’t know if this donation will continue from year to year as such they don’t want to commit to a long term contribution.  After reviewing the applicants, it was decided to offer a two $500 scholarship funded by ILM.

The Scholarship committees approached the ILMA Board with the idea to name the IEPA funded scholarship in honor of Steve Kolstol, a long-time supporter of ILMA and the as you have heard a person with a great passion for the environment.  The Steve Kolstol IEPA scholarship goes to Anthony Breitenbach. Anthony is a fulltime doctorate student attending Illinois State University.  His goals include designing a free outdoor education program for children centered on teaching environmental science and biology. His project is looking to evaluate how sex determination in the red-eared slider turtle, a component of lake and watershed ecosystems in Illinois, will be affected by thermal variability arising from climate change.

The second ILMA scholarship goes to Elizabeth Berg. Elizabeth is a first-year masters student at Loyola where she is seeking her master’s in biology.  Her goals include pursuing her PhD and continuing to conduct research in academia and/or governmental and non-profit work. Her current research focuses on assessing factors that influence the transport dynamics of microplastic in streams. Microplastics (fragments, fibers, or particles of plastic) are aquatic pollutants of increasing concern throughout the world. They absorb high levels of harmful chemicals, are often ingested by small organisms, travel long distances through rivers and streams, and are extremely difficult to remove.

The first ILM $500 scholarship goes to Jared Bilak.  Jared is a PhD candidate attending Southern Illinois University – Carbondale where he is seeking his degree in Zoology.  The overall objective of his research project is to understand the seasonal movement of the mudpuppy and summer habitat requirements. His project is in collaboration with the Shedd Aquarium in Chicago.

The second ILM $500 scholarship goes to Gare Ambrose-Igho.  Gare is a first-year graduate student at Illinois State University where she is seeking a degree in Hydrogeology. Her project is using remote sensing to explore the timing and spatial patterns of algal blooms and compare ground collected data from various sites within two reservoirs.


Next year’s conference will be back up north in Crystal Lake at the Holiday Inn (2017 Conference location).  We look forward to seeing everyone there.

~p0sted by Admin

Advertisements

Lake County Health Department (LCHD) to Host Lakes Forum

The Lake County Health Department Lakes Management Unit (LCHD-LMU) is hosting a 2-hour lakes forum at the Lake County Permit Center, 500 W. Winchester Road in Libertyville from 1-3pm on April 13th.  April 13th Lake Forum Flyer.  The forum will feature three speakers talking about topics such as fish structures, invasive species, and resident/HOA projects.  The forum is being sponsored in part by the Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA).  While the event is free it is requested that you RSVP Lake County as seating is limited.

Lake County Hosted Lake Management Workshop

The Lake County Health Department, Lakes Management Unit (LMU) will be hosting a workshop on developing and writing your own lake management plan.  Lake Management Planning Workshop Feb 24 2018.  These are useful documents to establish lake milestones and gauge the progress of your lake  and association performance over time.  Coupled with applicable watershed plans they can serve as valuable road maps to improving the water quality and internal working of your lake.  The workshop is assisted in its presentation with staff member Holly Hudson of the Chicago Metropolitan Agency for Planning (CMAP) and co-sponsored by the Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA).  Tune in here for any changes!

~p0sted by Admin

Call for Presenters

Illinois Lakes Management Association
2018 Conference
Parke Regency Hotel & Conference Center
Bloomington, IL
March 22-24, 2018
The Illinois Lakes Management Association is hosting its 33rd annual conference in 2018 in Bloomington, Illinois from March 22nd to March 23th (with workshops held on the 24th). We are looking to fill out our conference sessions with talks and presentations from professionals, teachers, students, or others with detailed knowledge on issues associated with lake, waterway, and watershed management.  Presentations should be approximately 20 minutes with time for questions following. Our conference sessions include the following topics:

– Managing Stormwater in Municipal Areas
– How Stormwater Impacts Water Quality in Lakes and Streams
– Planning Lake and Stream Restoration Projects
– Dam and Levee Safety, Management, and Permitting
– Fishery Production in Hyper-eutrophic Lakes
– How Land Use in Watersheds Affect Fish Populations
– Granting Implementation, Managing Projects from Inception to Close-out
– Principles of Hydrology
– Nutrient Cycling in Lakes
– Managing Lake Shorelines
– Promoting Sustainable Development
– Invasive Species Management

In addition to presentations, a poster session will be held on Thursday. If you are interested in either providing a poster or being a presenter, please submit abstracts by December 15 th , 2017. Abstracts should not exceed 250 words and be submitted [online] at http://www.ilma-lakes.org/call-for-presenters or [emailed] to Bryan Cross at bcross@prairieengineers.com. Audio and video will be provided by ILMA. Notification of abstract acceptance will be provided by ILMA no later than December 31 st .

ILMA Phragmites POD Upcoming

The Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA) will be hosting another Point of Discussion (POD) at Emmett’s Ale House in Palatine, IL on November 9th at 7:00PM.  The phragmites issue in northeastern Illinois as well as areas throughout the midwest has become a critical issue.  This very destructive invasive will be reviewed and discussion will be led by Mr. Paul Bollinger of Bollinger Environmental, Inc. (BEI).  Paul has been in the environmental consulting field for over a decade and has liaised on projects for local and regional agencies.

FYI – The presentation has been uploaded to the Media Center as of 11/15/2017.

Join us for a lively discussion at Emmett’s and enjoy a few crafts brews.  Emmett’s Ale House is Located at:

110 North Brockway Street
Palatine, Illinois 60067

Phone: 847-359-1533

https://www.emmettsbrewingco.com/

 

ILMA to begin survey process

The Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA) is in a constant process of trying to better understand the needs of it constituency: lake managers & their associated groups, the lake-stakeholder decision making process, watershed group function, and ILMA’s role in an advisory capacity.  Although this is a role ILMA has provided since inception of the association, the course of these surveys is to drill down deeper into the overall cross section of lake & surface water users and dissect the results top to bottom.  This can help ILMA better understand and serve both individuals and groups with educational content from presentations, seminars and workshops.

Soliciting information is tough for any group.  Response rate for typical surveys is often less than 25% and can often be as low as 10% depending on the target audience.  At any rate, the information is necessary for ILMA to continually provide valuable information and determine who is receiving the information and how it is being used.

In 2014, the ILMA Board of Directors (Directors) attempted an open forum for discussion at their annual conference in DeKalb as an attempt to receive “fresh material” or ideas from attendees of the conference.  The forum constituted a session within the conference that could be attended by anyone at the conference including vendors and industry experts.  Upon an open request for topical input, ILMA direction, or general questions, a roomful of nearly 100 individuals ranging from lake and industry experts to general lake property owners, not one unprompted response was provided.  Because of this, it is uncertain that if such solicitation of information is best approached in isolated conditions or in smaller groups.

At this time ILMA will be focusing on reaching out to constituent groups such as those listed above; however an additional focus is warranted to better serve the total user base.  Most lake groups consist of members of varying education or participation levels.  Some are extremely dedicated, including those who have invested personal time to expand their understanding of the lake and watershed environment.  This person may often lead the group while the remain board or stakeholder membership may consist of local residents simply looking to lend a helping hand.  With this survey ILMA intends to extend into this secondary group and explore not only group leaders but the entirety of the membership that make up these groups.

Test survey groups will be explored later this month with representative pilot surveys and the results and surveys will be refined as the work progresses.  The initial surveys will likely be hand or email distributed to help improve effectiveness.  Subsequent delivery of surveys will very in presentation from what is suggested above to possible internet delivery.  Test Group 1A is the Tower Lakes Improvement Association (TLIA) and Bangs Lake Advisory Committee (BLAC) of Tower Lakes and Wauconda, respectively.

~p0sted by Admin

Lake Count WMB Grants Available

On September 12th, the Lake County Stormwater Management Comission (SMC) announced the availability of funding of another round of their Watershed Management Board (WNB) Grants.  These have been available on a yearly cycle.  The official announcement can be located here:

https://www.lakecountyil.gov/CivicAlerts.aspx?AID=923

This grant cycle includes another round of their Watershed Management Assistance Grants (WMAG) routinely focused for capacity building of watershed protection groups.

The grants have a cost cap upwards of 20K and can be reduced downward from that value depending on the competition of other applicants and merit of the provided application.  One of the main objectives of these grants is to identify partnerships, so a good application should include a thorough investigation into who may all benefit from the project and an emphasis through letters of support when available.

The grants are separated by one of the four main watersheds identified in Lake County, Illinois; the Fox River, The Des Plaines River, the North Branch of the Chicago River, or Lake Michigan.  These grants are significant because they can defray costs of smaller projects; specifically those for schools, municipalities, or even individual property owners who typically have limited funds.  These are great for shoreline restoration and pond retrofits.

There is a much more thorough breakdown of the application process located on the link provided above.  Grant applications are due on the 6th of October and do require signature from a WMB representative identified in the submittal packet.

We hope to have a more complete Blog Post regarding grants later in the year.

Best of Luch from IllinoisLakes and the Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA)!

~p0sted by Admin

10 Things You Can Do to Know Your Lake Better

It is important that we step back and consider the group of individuals that are on the fence when it comes to lakes.  There is obviously a dedicated group of individuals that help care for and are directly connected to the management of a water body, but many individuals who are lake or stream side property holders or enthusiasts either feel disengaged or not intelligent enough to become actively engaged with day to day activities.  At the Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA), our primary sponsor of the IllinoisLakes Blog we feel “the more the merrier”.

In the context of the title “your lake” it may reference a body of water you currently live on, frequent, or may mean several lakes.  Getting engaged IS important as it helps set directives for your organization and may help them better allocate future funding.  In the case of public or quasi-public lakes it may have the ability to influence outside funding sources.  Perhaps the list below can be used to help assist in influencing involvement as well or better manage overall.  Without further ado:

  1. Seek out your lake management association if you have one 🙂 – to some this is great place to start.  Some groups operate better than others, but observing the initial input and back and forth conversation will allow you to better understand what issues are involved in the overall management of the lake and where your piece of the pie might fit in.
  2. Enjoy some simple ecology.  The water is the source of all life and habitat to so many different species from plants to insects, amphibians, fish, and invertebrates.  So many of these things rely on each other to survive, it will make you think twice about reducing shoreline habitat to bulkheads and seawalls which support places for various young fish and other insects to forage.
  3. Find the lake gage.  Hydrology impacts how the lake or water body elevations fluctuate from time to time.  Seeing how the water responds to certain amounts of rainfall is fun.  Precipitation is needed to move stagnant water around from time to time (affecting residence time), so it is an important element in the success of the lake or waterbody.
  4. Get to know the “ins and outs” of the system, literally.  People tend to see these areas as trouble areas but they are extremely useful indicators for monitoring conditions.  If the water coming into the lake is “dirtier” than the water leaving your lake then your lake is soaking up the difference.  If it’s the other way around than you may have an internal cycling problem.  Simple observations can mean a lot.  How to do this with minimal cost may be a future topic of discussion.
  5. Search for documentation regarding your lake.  What seems somewhat tedious in the world of lake management is the oblivious nature at which people base their decisions.  The year is 2017 and there is much more literature out there about lakes and most likely something about your lake!  The Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) has been under mandate by the Clean Water Act (CWA) to study the watersheds draining to the majority of our streams and lakes and as such has already started a dialogue.  Those of you living in Lake County are likely aware of the fantastic background work completed by the Health Department’s Lake Management Unit.  There are other sources out there in the form of watershed plans as well.  These may all identify issues that can further help you understand your lake.
  6. Have a cold one.  So many of us ignore the lake once the ice cap goes on but there are observations to be made during the winter and colder months as well.  Some trouble areas can be more visible once the vegetation dies back.  This is a great time to do some ground truthing.
  7. Eye in the sky.  If you’ve never taken a detailed look at the area around your lake via aerial photography it’s worth a look.  Looking at various land use and road patterns may lead you to questions as to “how much chloride is coming of that road?”  “Is that a problem?”
  8. Where do those pipes come from?  Many people see water draining from phantom pipes into the lake or stream and think nothing of it.  These pipes serve a purpose and that is to drain water away from somewhere else and keep people reasonably safe from flooding.  The unintended consequence however is that materials other than water comes along for the ride.
  9. Learn the difference between algae and plants.  Reason:  While some animals do consume algae, having it in your lake is usually an indicator of something that is above it natural range.  A little algae is certainly normal but with today’s concerns over potentially harmful algae strains it is time to start reconsidering why the algae may be there in the first place.
  10. Look at the plants in your lake.  Get to know them.  The terms native and invasive are important to know.  If your lake is encumbered by large amounts of invasive species it can be tough for the native species to compete.  The invasive plants have limited end users and by displacing native species they complicate the food web for fish, amphibians, and invertebrates.

~p0sted by Admin

Let’s Talk About Dams Part 2

Part 1 of this Blog post visited dams from a sort of historical perspective as well as provided a glimpse of how dams are viewed and permitted from a regulatory perspective, particularly in the Midwest and the State of Illinois.  It really is a “cliff notes” version of that information as a whole and in any case you should reference the embedded links for more in-depth reading or directly consult an expert.

In the second part of this blog discussion article, the focus will shift more to a water quality slant, with how dams can be viewed as an impact and the subsequent trend toward dam removal.  Although there is no question that dams alter the natural flow regimes of rivers and streams, they are also viewed as historical and are revered by some fishermen and the general public.  Removing dams is at times controversial, and many times expensive to a point where there is little incentive for the owner of said dam to go through the process.

Most certainly there is a distinctive difference between dams on already impounded waters (lakes, ponds, and reservoirs) versus rivers and other moving waters.  While many plants and organisms may be found in both habitats, they may prefer one over the other, for example largemouth bass may prefer impounded waters whereas trout may be more partial to river systems.  This is likely to be partially tied to the conditions that may exist in those two particular environments.  The biggest issue associated with dams is the alteration of riverine systems to an impounded state where the internal ecology of the stream starts to function more like a lake in areas of that stream.  This obviously creates an environment where organisms better suited for those habitats begin to better compete and potentially out-compete riverine species.

There is really nowhere better to see an example of this scenario at play than right in our own back yard.  The Fox River south of the Chain O’ Lakes demonstrates many of these very ecological indicators.  While the Fox Waterway Agency (FWA) maintains the Fox River from the Wisconsin border to the Algonquin Dam, other groups have been working hard to study the group while others work as stewards of the river.  One such group, the Fox River Study Group, has worked hard to study the chemistry of the river within Illinois starting below the Chain O’ Lakes down to the Yorkville area.  They have made these very same observations through their studies.  Although these observations have been made, the traction to remove even low-head dams on the Fox River in Illinois has been slow, for many of the same reasons provided earlier in this post.

On the reverse side of the coin is the Des Plaines River which has seen some success in dam removals throughout the past 10 years.  Reports appear to have been good at least from a fishing standpoint.  We have not heard much on the negativity side of things, outside of some navigability with stream speeds and depth in spots.  If that is the worst thing to come from the dam removal process, then it looks like it is well worth it.

Along with the ecological changes that are briefly discussed above, there is a chemical alteration that is tied to changes that take place immediately upstream and downstream of the formal dam structure.  Streams have a natural appetite for sediments; however the downstream fate of the sediment is much different in a stream system that has incurred the installation of structures intended to slow, divert, or impound water.  These structures can serve a source of ultimate deposition and initial source of stream bed scour.  While the day to day function of dams seems harmless enough, the the power of falling water cannot be overstated.  This very premise is relied upon as a viable source of energy to this day.  Now the remaining several thousand dams across the country may have not been instituted for the purpose of hydroelectric generation, but many still have the capability to generate enormous amounts of energy which is released as scour upon the downstream stream bed.  The amount released is dependent upon the elevation of the dam crest and the amount of flow going over the top which can be a function of rain or a scheduled man-made release from upstream or a combination of both.

Immediately upstream of the dam the exact opposite function is occurring.  Water tends to stagnate, leaving a sediment deposition zone.  These zones have limited space of course and over time a sort of baseflow equilibrium is reached with the stream.  Equilibrium can be disrupted at times of high flow as well.  This is caused by the upwelling of materials immediately upstream as water must contract to release over the spillway.  This will create space upstream of the dam where sediment can once again deposit and the cycle repeats itself.

Keep in mind that within a stream, river or any other body of moving water, just like a lake there is ongoing chemical changes taking place constantly.  This does not end at the sediment surface.  Underneath the sediment-water interface there is all kinds of biological and chemical activity.  We often see the results of this activity in both lakes and streams when we see gas released as bubbles to the surface.  Depending on storm surge or seasonal flood flow(s), these constituents can be dislodged en masse, creating pockets of biological oxygen demand (BOD) downstream or make noticeable  water chemistry change detrimental to the existing fish or invertebrate communities.

The above information is of course simplified to make this blog readable.  American Rivers has some great online documentation which discusses these points and further relays the benefits of restoring a riverine community.  On a local basis both the FRSG (link above) and the DuPage River Salt Creek Workgroup (DRSCW) have done independent work on their respective waters.  These workgroups appear to be a preferred model in which Illinois EPA (IEPA) hopes to further address point source pollution.

Based on the materials provided in the IllinoisLakes Blog Part I & II postings, it would appear that there is ample material to support the removal of dams.  The question may further be why is it so hard to remove them?  The process is quite onerous, at least in Illinois it can be.  As of right now the funding to inspect, maintain, and possibly remove a dam all falls on the owner of that dam.  Creative owners may be able to partner on a grant to remove as part of a restoration package, but it does not alleviate them from the formal process of removal initiated by the State of Illinois.  These can include studies of impact which typically cannot be recovered through the typical grant process.  Other states do have revenue sources in place with the sole purpose of assisting in the removal and modification of dams.

This sums up the IllinoisLakes Blog Part 2 take on dams.  We hope you found it informational and enjoyable.  Remember the IllinoisLakes Blog is sponsored by the Illinois Lakes Management Association (ILMA).  If you are interested in lakes like we are please visit our webpage for more information or visit us on Facebook or any one of our numerous public POD sessions.

~p0sted by Admin

 

Our love affair with Water

Those of us from the upper midwest tend to have a love affair with water.  Some of us grew up around water, some of us live on water, some are avid fishermen, but there is a certain calmness and serenity that comes with water, and the lake environment brings this out more than most.  Even most recreational users enjoy the setting for more than just running up and down the shoreline full throttle.

The majority of lakes in the State of Illinois are the responsibility of the lake property owners as few are public or quasi public.  Because of this the management of these lakes is also privatized and the decisions on how to best “use” the lake is often a decision made by local property owners with varying agendas.  How do we best protect and manage our waters in the State of Illinois?  Opinions certainly vary.  Is it best to protect and manage our lake for fishing?  Is it best to manage for recreational navigability?  Is there a balance that can be obtained?  The answers to these questions are not black and white as our lakes are all a bit different.  No two lakes are identical and therefore the blueprint for maintaining our waters would be somewhat varied for each.

On back to the original theme of this post, how does our need to be close to the water directly impact the source?  What compromises are people willing to make in their daily lives to be a better lakeside property owner?  To better protect the adjacent waters or downstream water resources?  Dig into this new blog and our hope is that with time the content contained within will become a useful tool for private citizens as well as water resources professionals.  We will update content when we can and do our best to keep followers updated with pertinent information.  Subscribe or check back often to share your love affair with water together with us!

-p0sted by Admin